Anaesthesia

Most cosmetic surgery procedures require a general anaesthetic for your comfort. The safety of your anaesthesia is paramount. Mr Grover only works with two specific Consultant Anaesthetists both of whom hold NHS appointments at University College Hospital as well as working in Private Practice with Mr Grover at King Edward VII Hospital. Both have worked with Mr Grover for over 10 years and are experienced in anaesthetic techniques for Plastic Surgery. As an indication of his trust in these two Anaesthetists, Mr Grover has personally requested that one of them put him to sleep when he underwent surgery to his elbow in 2006. These two Anaesthetists are professionals he trusts totally and you can be reassured they will take excellent care of you as a patient just as they did for him! The following are some commonly asked questions which you may find helpful.

What happens before your anaesthetic?
What happens when you are taken to the operating theatre?
Are general anaesthetics safe?
Will I need any tests?
When should I stop eating or drinking before my operation?
Should I continue my prescribed medication?
If I have had a cold recently, will I be able to have surgery?
I have crowns/ a bridge/ a veneer. Will this be a problem?
Are there any after effects of a general anaesthetic?
Will I be sick after the anaesthetic?

What happens before your anaesthetic?
Do not to eat or drink anything for 8 hours before your planned procedure if it involves general anaesthesia or local anaesthetic with sedation. This usually means coming to hospital on the morning of surgery having had nothing to eat or drink from midnight before.

When you arrive at the hospital in the morning you will see the anaesthetist and have the opportunity to discuss the options that best suit you for the procedure. When you talk to the Anaesthetist before surgery, please show them all the medications you are taking as this will reduce the chance of any interaction with the anaesthetic.

Often you will be asked to take some medicines prior to going for surgery. These pre-medications are designed to aid the anaesthesia and surgery as well as makes things more comfortable for you.

What happens when you are taken to the operating theatre?
For a procedure requiring a general anaesthetic you will be asked to recline on a bed and be connected to monitoring equipment to record your vital signs. During this time and throughout the course of the operation the anaesthetist will be with you to ensure your safety and comfort.

Most people choose to have an anaesthetic administered by an injection, however if you have a fear of needles occasionally other techniques can be employed. The anaesthetic will drift you off to sleep in a few seconds. The first thing you are likely to remember is waking up in the recovery room. Here you will be looked after until it is safe for you to return to the ward.

Most people are slightly anxious about surgery and anaesthesia. The anaesthetic team are there to make it as safe and comfortable as possible.

Are general anaesthetics safe?
Yes they are. Although any operation and anaesthetic carries a slight risk, if you are generally healthy this is very low indeed. In a recent survey of operations in the United Kingdom, serious problems due to elective anaesthesia occurred in about 5 in every million anaesthetics given. To put this in perspective you are hundreds of times more likely to have a car accident on the way to the hospital than have a significant problem with the anaesthetic.

Will I need any tests?

You may require preoperative investigations such as blood tests, x-rays or an electrocardiogram (ECG). These will be discussed with you at your initial consultation and can be carried out on the day of the operation, so as not to inconvenience you.

When should I stop eating or drinking before my operation?
Do not to eat or drink anything for 8 hours before your planned procedure if it involves general anaesthesia or local anaesthetic with sedation.  This usually means coming to hospital on the morning of surgery having had nothing to eat or drink from midnight before. This does not apply if you are having a simple local anaesthetic.  This will be made clear in the information sent to you by Mr Groverís office staff, but if you are in any doubt please ask.

Should I continue my prescribed medication?
Yes it is important to continue with most medications up to and including the day of surgery. The important exception to this is Aspirin which must be stopped at least 14 days before surgery to reduce the risk of bleeding.  Certain other drugs such as Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g. Brufen, Neurofen and Voltarol) should also be stopped preferably two weeks before surgery.

If I have had a cold recently, will I be able to have surgery?
Providing you are not feeling unwell there is usually no cause for concern. If you suffer from chest problems, such as asthma or bronchitis it would be wise to discuss this with the team before your operation.

I have crowns/ a bridge/ a veneer. Will this be a problem?
Please tell the Anaesthetist about any loose teeth, crowns, bridges, veneers or dentures in order to avoid damage. Special instruments used to place breathing tubes can press on teeth and so care will be taken with loose teeth or crowns. We appreciate how important teeth and dental implants are to you so all the staff will take special care when looking after you.

Are there any after effects of a general anaesthetic?
Some people are prone to nausea following anaesthetics. However this can usually be prevented with modern advances in medication. Sore throat associated with breathing tube placement is common, but usually only lasts a day or so. In addition there are a number of infrequent, less serious effects, such as pain and bruising at the site of injections and headaches which usually settle very quickly.

Will I be sick after the anaesthetic?
If you have been sick with a previous anaesthetic please advise the Anaesthetist as specific medications can be given to prevent this. In addition the anaesthetic itself can be tailored to further reduce the chance of sickness.

© 2005-2017 Rajiv Grover 144 Harley Street London W1G 7LE Tel 020 7486 4301